Faith

Christianity is kinda like vampirism

 

In defense of vampires….we’re all kinda them too

The mythology of vampirism is that they’re humans turned immortal surviving off of the blood (life) of others. We can see why this is unScriptural. I would not argue that this creature is holy and pure by any means. But there is a Christian perspective to this mythology that can bring clarity and depth to these stories.

A new way of seeing the Romans 6 struggle: Just as humans daily have a struggle between their sin nature and the glory God has designed us for, vampires have a struggle between their vampirism and their humanity. Like Christians working to restore what was lost in the Fall, vampires strive to restore the humanity they lost. You see, vampires for the most part have NOT chosen this lifestyle; like humans are born with a sinful nature, vampires are forced into a vampiric nature.

Rabbit: Chasing Beth Rider
The best Christian vampire book I’ve found. Read it!

My favorite vampire fix would be Vampire Diaries. On the tv show, some vampires drink animal blood, some drink “fresh” human blood, from the vein. Others drink human blood but only from “blood bags,” taking from blood donation locations and hospitals. Some vampires have embraced this part of their new life, while others are wracked by shame and contempt for the very nature they can’t seem to escape.

Each of these “dietary” choices come with their own dilemmas at different times. The shame and guilt of breaking your own standards. The problem of stealing blood from hospitals. The manipulation of drinking from the vein. And what if the strength of animal blood is not enough to fight off an enemy, and the friend tells you that you should drink from their vein – is it okay then, to save your friends? You see what I’m getting at – no longer black and white issues, but daily areas that appear so grey at times.

It’s easy to say “Thou shall not steal” and the set standards of living for God. The day-to-day living gets harder to see where the black and white is. There’s a part in [the non-vampire fantastical tale] “The Land of Stories” where the brother lies to his teacher to help his sister. The narrator says “it was the wrong thing to do as a student, but the right thing to do as a brother.” I won’t say whether that is justified in God’s sight or not. I’m just saying getting into the gnitty-gritty of life, sin gets a little confusing. And vampirism shows this struggle with a new perspective – a little more distanced, but also a little deeper.

*If you enjoyed this post, I’ve also written a Christian defense of the Fantasy genre, Horror genre, and Romance genre, as well as a defense of fiction in general.

 

Is it weird to say vampires are relatable?

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for the Bookworms, for the Writers

Why I Like Major Character Death (Thank You, Veronica Roth!)

You Read That Right – Everyone, Meet My Morbid Side

I’d like to say I exaggerated in that title a tad, that I don’t like death of characters I’m close to in books I read; but anyone who knows my book choices knows that I have some sort of minor obsession with character death. I think of Peter Pan’s “To die would be an awfully big adventure.” Or Anne of Green Gable’s romanticizing the death of Elaine in a reenactment. For me, when a character I care about dies, it’s devastating and tragic, but also oddly satisfactory and wonderful.

The Perfect Philosophy of Character Death

Recently while reading the Divergent series, I came across the most perfect Philosophy of Character Death ever. It encapsulates my feelings on character death. I recently posted on facebook for everyone to buy the book Insurgent just to read that (and then to read the rest of the book as a bonus of course.) But I found a cheaper option for those not interested in the series (le sigh, whyyyy not?????). You can (read “should”) enjoy the full post here, but the 3 main points are:

1) Character deaths should be felt by the reader, so it should be known characters that die.

2) For Veronica Roth’s stories (and most of mine too probably) it’s too much suspension of disbelief for the favorite most-well-known characters to survive unscathed. If main characters are constantly in danger and never gravely injured or dead – let me put it bluntly – that’s stupid!

3) Contrary to reader belief, authors don’t control everything in the story. God created a world that He controls, but humans have free will in that. Authors often have a similar dilemma – they create a story-world and control so many outside forces, but characters when created well have a mind of their own and will up and die without our planning on it.

I am in complete agreement here, and well, if you haven’t figured out yet, if you read my stories, you may want to brace yourself for a major character death or two. After all, life isn’t easy in these story-worlds we create.

 

What do you think?

Do you agree with Veronica Roth on each of her points? Do you find major character deaths satisfactory? Do you avoid tragic storylines like the plague? Comment below, I wanna know your take.

For another take on character death and some writing tips, check out http://www.writersedit.com/effective-ways-deal-character-deaths/ …. “Has death in fiction become a cheap gimmick, included with the sole intention of nabbing awards?”